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Welcome In Inspiration and Motivation Corner

"Welcome every morning with a smile. Look on the new day as another special gift from your creator, another golden opportunity to complete what you were unable to finish yesterday. Be a self-starter. Let your first hour set the theme of success and positive action that is certain to echo through your entire day. Today will never happen again. Don't waste it with a false start or no start at all. You were not born to fail."

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Inspiration

Inspiration


  • Stimulation of the mind or emotions to a high level of feeling or activity.
  • The condition of being so stimulated.
  • An agency, such as a person or work of art, that moves the intellect or emotions or prompts action or invention.
  • Something, such as a sudden creative act or idea, that is inspired.
  • The quality of inspiring or exalting: a painting full of inspiration.
  • Divine guidance or influence exerted directly on the mind and soul of humankind.
  • The act of drawing in, especially the inhalation of air into the lungs.

History Of The Concepts

Ancient Models Of Inspiration

In Greek thought, inspiration meant that the poet or artist would go into ecstasy or furor poeticus, the divine frenzy or poetic madness. He or she would be transported beyond his own mind and given the gods' or goddesses own thoughts to embody.Inspiration is prior to consciousness and outside of skill (ingenium in Latin).

Enlightenment and Romantic models

The descent of the Holy Spirit on the day of the Pentecost and sudden inspiration of the Apostles In the 18th century in England, nascent psychology competed with a renascent celebration of the mystical nature of inspiration.

Modernist and modern concepts

Sigmund Freud and other later psychologists located inspiration in the inner psyche of the artist. The artist's inspiration came out of unresolved psychological conflict or childhood trauma. Further, inspiration could come directly from the subconscious. Like the Romantic genius theory and the revived notion of "poetic phrenzy," Freud saw artists as fundamentally special, and fundamentally wounded.